Bitcoin cash is a different story. Bitcoin cash was started by bitcoin miners and developers equally concerned with the future of the cryptocurrency, and its ability to scale effectively. These individuals had their reservations about the adoption of a segregated witness technology, though. They felt as though SegWit2x did not address the fundamental problem of scalability in a meaningful way, nor did it follow the roadmap initially outlined by Satoshi Nakamoto, the anonymous party that first proposed the blockchain technology behind cryptocurrency. Furthermore, the process of introducing SegWit2x as the road forward was anything but transparent, and there were concerns that its introduction undermined the decentralization and democratization of the currency.
Like any speculative investment, buying bitcoin at sky-high valuations is risky business. If you’re asking, “Is it smart to invest in bitcoin?” you might do well to heed this advice from billionaire investor Mark Cuban, who told MONEY, “It’s still very much a gamble.” You need to know that your bitcoin investment might lose money. If you’re not prepared to face that prospect, bitcoin investment might not be for you.
In a blog post earlier this week titled “The Crypto Currency Debate: Future of Money or Speculative Hype?”, “dean of valuation” and NYU Stern Professor Aswath Damordan said that the future of cryptocurrency as a currency, as opposed to a speculative asset as it is so often treated, depends on cryptocurrency developers thinking of their technology as a “transaction medium and acting accordingly.” Both of these moves seem to be aimed at improving cryptocurrency technology as a medium of exchange.

As the legend goes, in 2008 an anonymous developer published a white paper under the fake name Satoshi Nakamoto. The author was evidently a software and math person. But the paper also has some in-built ideology: the assumption that giving national governments the ability to monitor flows of money in the financial system and use it as a form of law enforcement is wrong.
The MACD made a bearish cross, and the RSI has also broken from its persistent flatline and now dips toward oversold territory. A number of investors and analysts are attributing the current volatility to the BCH fork — but it should be noted that Bitcoin frequently dipped below $6,200 and $6,100 and BTC’s inability to overcome overhead resistances highlights an underlying weakness. So while surprising, today’s dip below $6,000 seemed inevitable.
Now Bitcoin Cash's camp of big-block dissidents is about to divide once again. The schism pits the maintainers of the leading Bitcoin Cash implementation, called Bitcoin ABC, against Craig Wright. Wright is one of the most controversial figures in the bitcoin world. He has claimed to be bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto, but his claim is doubted by a number of bitcoin insiders—Ethereum founder Vitalik Buterin has labeled Wright a "fraud."

Bitcoin Cash was forked from Bitcoin and therefore has a similar infrastructure supporting it. BCH implemented larger block sizes than Bitcoin to fix network congestion, and they have gone on to be the most successful Bitcoin offshoot. Bitcoin Cash wants to compete with other payment processors like PayPal and Visa in terms the number of transactions they can process on the network.

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