For me, though, I look at Bitcoin not just as a currency, but what it could do in the future in other applications. Think of the Bitcoin technology as a way to exchange and verify ownership. It’s like getting into your car with your smartphone. You present cryptographic proof of ownership. You’re the owner, and it’s verified through this common ledger. The car is able to identify that it is your car, and so the car starts. You’re done.
That being said, it isn’t perfect. One of the most pressing issues for the cryptocurrency has always been its scalability. More specifically, it’s been the size of a block of transactions, which upon the creation of Bitcoin was limited to one MB. This limit causes substantial delays in transaction processing times and limits the number of transactions the network can process.
The latest debates around bitcoin’s technology have been concerned with this central problem of scaling and increasing the speed of the transaction verification process. There are two major solutions to this problem, either to make the amount of data that need to be verified in each block smaller, making transactions faster and cheaper or to make the blocks of data bigger, so that more information can be processed at one time.  
A scenario that feels likely to this reporter is that both chains live on indefinitely. Whether or not either token enjoys a bullish token price across exchanges, it’s hard to imagine Craig Wright or Calvin Ayre coming back into the fold at this point, nor Roger Ver and Jihan Wu welcoming them back if they decided to do so. CoinGeek by itself has the capability to prop up the SV blockchain, and its media efforts have the capability to continually attract new users and widen the base. (Bitcoin ABC has the same capabilities utilizing a wider array of resources – Jihan Wu, Roger Ver, the coterie of major exchanges which have come out in definitive support of ABC.)
Bitcoin Cash is a cryptocurrency.[4] In mid-2017, a group of developers wanting to increase bitcoin's block size limit prepared a code change. The change, called a hard fork, took effect on 1 August 2017. As a result, the bitcoin ledger called the blockchain and the cryptocurrency split in two.[5] At the time of the fork anyone owning bitcoin was also in possession of the same number of Bitcoin Cash units.[5]
Bitcoin OTC markets are “off-the-books” decentralized exchanges that occur through face-to-face meetings and remote trades. In a face-to-face exchange, the buyer and seller will meet at a designated time and place and exchange cash for bitcoin at an agreed-upon rate. In remote exchanges, the trade is coordinated by telephone, email, or another remote communication method. After a price is agreed upon between buyer and seller, the buyer will send an electronic funds transfer to the seller and the seller will send the bitcoin to the buyer’s bitcoin address.
Since very few countries in the world are working on regulation of Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency in general, these exchanges can be shut down. This happened in China sometime in September 2017. Exchanges are also at risk of getting hacked and you might lose your Bitcoin if you store it on an exchange. You can read about the biggest Bitcoin hacks here.
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