As a result, a compromise protocol called SegWit2x was developed. Launching this protocol meant storing some of the information outside of the Blockchain as well as increasing the block size limit to two MB. The protocol was implemented on Aug. 1, 2017, after 95 percent of miners voted for the proposal. However, the network didn’t see the immediate increase in the block size limit. To a lot of people, this meant postponing a problem instead of solving it.

Earlier this year the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rejected a bid by Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, the twins infamous for claiming that Mark Zuckerberg stole the idea of Facebook from them while they were undergrads at Harvard, to launch a bitcoin-based ETF (exchange-traded fund). The decision from the SEC came nearly four years after they filed for regulatory approval. In the immediate aftermath of this news, the price of bitcoins, which had nearly tripled over the last year, significantly dropped to less than $1,000.


Rising fees on the bitcoin network contributed to a push by some in the community to create a hard fork to increase the blocksize.[14] This push came to a head in July 2017 when some members of the Bitcoin community including Roger Ver felt that adopting BIP 91 without increasing the block-size limit favored people who wanted to treat Bitcoin as a digital investment rather than as a transactional currency.[15][16] This push by some to increase the block size met a resistance. Since its inception up to July 2017, bitcoin users had maintained a common set of rules for the cryptocurrency.[15] Eventually, a group of bitcoin activists,[12] investors, entrepreneurs, developers[15] and largely China based miners were unhappy with bitcoin's proposed SegWit improvement plans meant to increase capacity and pushed forward alternative plans for a split which created Bitcoin Cash.[11] The proposed split included a plan to increase the number of transactions its ledger can process by increasing the block size limit to eight megabytes.[15][16]
Last year, One Bitcoin rose from $997 to $19,000. That’s like 19 Times Returns on the BIGGEST & Number One cryptocurrency in the world. At the moment, 1 Bitcoin = $6500+ One of the biggest names in blockchain fînance is predicting a huge, imminent surge for bitcoin. Philip Nunn – CEO of Blackmore Group –believes we could see bitcoin hit $60,000 THIS year 2018.That would be an enormous 795% leap from where it sits today. This means almost ALL altcoins Under $1 – $20 per coin can go as high as 20 Times – 50 Times Returns. Do you know… Read more »

Bitcoin Cash is a cryptocurrency.[4] In mid-2017, a group of developers wanting to increase bitcoin's block size limit prepared a code change. The change, called a hard fork, took effect on 1 August 2017. As a result, the bitcoin ledger called the blockchain and the cryptocurrency split in two.[5] At the time of the fork anyone owning bitcoin was also in possession of the same number of Bitcoin Cash units.[5]

Be skeptical of the hype. According to Welch, “in every way, the cryptocurrency market is a flow of supply and demand.” It’s one of the reasons it fluctuates so wildly. “When you see a lot of hype and excitement around a volatile investment that depends on supply and demand, take pause and look at what’s really going on.” He advises to take caution when you start to hear phrases like “get it before it’s gone” and “you won’t want to miss out on this.” A lot of hype can often be the precursor to a crash.
But before we get to the tutorial steps, it's really important to know what we're getting into. Increasingly I hear from students making mistakes due to rushing into Bitcoin because of all the hype. There's so much fragmented or misleading information out there. My aim here is to strip it to total basics without putting you off for another 4 years (hopefully).
More than an investment, cryptocurrencies are an ongoing technology and socioeconomic experiment. As a result, the blockchain space is booming with new opportunities. With an approximate market cap of $280 billion, rest assured that this industry is here to stay. This new industry is constantly evolving, therefore the earlier you get acquainted with it, the higher your chance are of benefiting from its future development.
The rules of the bitcoin protocol include the requirement that a user cannot send the same bitcoin more than once and a user cannot send bitcoin from an address for which they do not possess the private key. If a user tries to create a transaction that breaks the rules of the bitcoin protocol, it will automatically be rejected by the rest of the bitcoin network.
A rising trend in the world of cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin ATMs allow users to purchase Bitcoin with cash through machines that work almost identically to standard ATMs. With over 3,000 Bitcoin ATMs scattered across the world (primarily in large metro areas throughout North America and Europe), you can use search tools such as Google Maps or Bitcoin ATM Radar to find one close. Just remember that while Bitcoin ATMs have low processing fees, they also have a low buying limit.
Bitcoin cash is a different story. Bitcoin cash was started by bitcoin miners and developers equally concerned with the future of the cryptocurrency, and its ability to scale effectively. These individuals had their reservations about the adoption of a segregated witness technology, though. They felt as though SegWit2x did not address the fundamental problem of scalability in a meaningful way, nor did it follow the roadmap initially outlined by Satoshi Nakamoto, the anonymous party that first proposed the blockchain technology behind cryptocurrency. Furthermore, the process of introducing SegWit2x as the road forward was anything but transparent, and there were concerns that its introduction undermined the decentralization and democratization of the currency.

As such, transactions will look identical on both chains. This means that a Bitcoin ABC transaction can be re-transmitted (“replayed”) on the Bitcoin SV chain, having users accidentally spend both. And the other way around: Bitcoin SV transactions can be replayed on Bitcoin ABC. When Ethereum Classic and Ethereum split without replay protection in 2016, this caused significant losses to unprepared exchanges, like Coinbase. Therefore, this time many exchanges and other service providers will halt withdrawals and/or deposits for some time.
Pro Tip:If you want to invest, but aren’t keen on using your own funds, consider utilizing accrued interest on a savings account to invest. Compare savings accounts and their interest rates. If you put a lot of money into savings every year, you could fund a sizable investment with just the money the bank pays you in interest. It eliminates your personal risk and maximizes your chances of a return.
CoinGeek owner (and online gambling tycoon) Calvin Ayre is probably also the most well-known individual supporting the Bitcoin SV hard fork — besides Craig Steven Wright, of course. Most “big name” Bitcoin Cash proponents instead appear supportive of the Bitcoin ABC hard fork — or at least dismissive of Wright and Bitcoin SV. This includes bitcoin.com CEO Roger Ver, Bitmain co-founder Jihan Wu, Pirate Party founder Rick Falkvinge, Cornell professor Emin Gün Sirer, but also Ethereum founder Vitalik Buterin and others.
Bitcoin has captured America’s imagination. Whether or not the cryptocurrency will ultimately turn out to be a good investment or just a passing fad remains to be seen. Indeed, in the past several months Bitcoin prices have enjoyed a run-up that makes the 1999 tech bubble look staid by comparison. That excitement — the promise of sudden riches or sudden ruin — has a lot of people wondering how a bitcoin investment actually works.
Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or banks; managing transactions and the issuing of bitcoins is carried out collectively by the network. Bitcoin is open-source; its design is public, nobody owns or controls Bitcoin and everyone can take part. Through many of its unique properties, Bitcoin allows exciting uses that could not be covered by any previous payment system.

Rising fees on the bitcoin network contributed to a push by some in the community to create a hard fork to increase the blocksize.[14] This push came to a head in July 2017 when some members of the Bitcoin community including Roger Ver felt that adopting BIP 91 without increasing the block-size limit favored people who wanted to treat Bitcoin as a digital investment rather than as a transactional currency.[15][16] This push by some to increase the block size met a resistance. Since its inception up to July 2017, bitcoin users had maintained a common set of rules for the cryptocurrency.[15] Eventually, a group of bitcoin activists,[12] investors, entrepreneurs, developers[15] and largely China based miners were unhappy with bitcoin's proposed SegWit improvement plans meant to increase capacity and pushed forward alternative plans for a split which created Bitcoin Cash.[11] The proposed split included a plan to increase the number of transactions its ledger can process by increasing the block size limit to eight megabytes.[15][16]
There are a few primary concerns surrounding bitcoin that potential investors should be aware of. First, it is not backed or regulated by the good faith of a government or other entity. This stands in stark contrast to the dollar, yuan, pound, and other forms of currency used around the globe. So, many people view bitcoin as something akin to Monopoly money, because it is neither a fiat currency nor is it based on something of tangible value like gold. In other words, a bitcoin is worth exactly what people perceive its worth to be. While, in a sense, this is true of any currency, the value of a bitcoin is much more fickle than other forms of currency because of its unregulated nature.
Second, bitcoins are not traded on Wall Street. They cannot be bought or sold through a brokerage. Instead, one must set up a bitcoin "wallet," which can probably best be thought of as a bank account exclusively for bitcoins. Once this account is set up, its holder can link to a traditional banking account and use those funds in local currency to buy and sell bitcoins.
Bitcoin Cash differs from Bitcoin Classic in that it increases the block size from 1 MB to 8 MB. It also removes Segregated Witness (SegWit), a proposed code adjustment designed to free up block space by removing certain parts of the transaction. The goal of Bitcoin Cash is to increase the number of transactions that can be processed, and supporters hope that this change will allow Bitcoin Cash to compete with the volume of transactions that PayPal and Visa can handle by increasing the size of blocks.
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Though in some cases reluctantly, most other Bitcoin Cash implementations have sided with Bitcoin ABC. The biggest of these, Bitcoin Unlimited, has made its latest release compatible with the Bitcoin ABC hard fork by default — though users can configure their software to be compatible with Bitcoin SV instead. Other Bitcoin Cash implementations, such as Bitprim and Bcash, are also compatible with Bitcoin ABC.
The Coinbase wallet is very secure, accessed through the Web app or mobile app, utilizes two-factor authentication and keeps redundant digital and paper backups of data “in safe deposit boxes and vaults around the world.” Plus, cash balances are insured up to $250,000 against theft or a breach in online storage. Further, Coinbase holds 98 percent of customer currencies offline to keep them safe from malicious hackers. This is further evidence to why Coinbase is a leader in digital currencies in the United States.
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