Bitcoin Cash (sometimes referred to as “Bcash” or “BCH”) is a cryptocurrency that split off from the main Bitcoin blockchain in August 2017. Culminating from Bitcoin’s years-long scaling dispute, the spinoff project most notably increased its block size limit through a contentious hard fork upgrade, “forking off” to become its own coin — though some of its proponents see it as the “real Bitcoin.” While currently trading at a fraction of bitcoin’s value — around $480 at the time of writing — Bitcoin Cash is the fourth biggest cryptocurrency by market cap and has garnered support from big names in the cryptocurrency space like bitcoin.com CEO Roger Ver and Bitmain co-founder Jihan Wu.
Maybe only one coin survives the split. In that case, wallets and other service providers will presumably support this coin, either right away or later on. If you hold your private keys and your wallet supports the coin, you will be able to transact. If your wallet does not, you’ll need to extract your wallet seed or private keys and insert them in a wallet that does. (There’s no rush to do any of this.)
Even as the existing payments system in developed countries becomes ever more convenient and secure, the space is still littered with middle parties taking a small amount from each transaction. These players include payment processors, payment networks, issuing banks, and acquiring banks. The dream of bitcoin and other monetary systems based on blockchain technology is for payers to be free of these inherent costs of exchanging currency for goods.

Lastly, you’ll have to connect a payment method. For years, credit cards were the most common way to pay for Bitcoin. Recently, however, credit card issuers and some international governments have put strict regulations on using credit cards as a buying option. Most credit cards are no longer accepted as a method of payment, meaning people have had to look into other options.
It will also depend on miners’ and users’ vision for the currency. If bitcoin really does undermine the decentralized nature of the network, and the democratic possibilities of the blockchain technology, people may look elsewhere for a cryptocurrency with more exciting potential. (For more insights on how the market has changed since the fork, read: What's Bitcoin Cash and Where the Heck Did it Come From?)
For those that don’t know, a hard fork is the only currently known method for developers to update Bitcoin software. Developers split the network and essentially create a new Blockchain with altered rules. The original and the forked version of the cryptocurrency have identical Blockchains all the way up to the block when the split occurred. From there on, the two networks exist independently.
“Bitcoin Cash is expected to conduct a hard fork upgrade on 15 November 2018. There are two competing incompatible hard fork upgrade proposals, with the associated clients being Bitcoin ABC and Bitcoin SV. On settlement, the BCHZ18 contract will settle at a price on the Bitcoin ABC side of any split and will NOT include the value of Bitcoin SV,” BitMEX said in a blog post.

First one piece of good news: You can buy fractions up to the eighth decimal place of bitcoin. That means you don’t need to plunk down the nearly $17,000 you often see quoted as the price for a full bitcoin — which is probably for the best, as we noted above. As of Thursday afternoon, that one ten-thousandth — four decimal places or 0.0001 — of a bitcoin is worth about $1.65.
Laszlo Hanyecz and Jeremy Sturdivant are unfamiliar names to most people, even to many in the crypto community. Yet Laszlo and Jeremy have the distinction of being the first men on record to respectively buy and sell a tangible, real-world asset using bitcoin. Back in 2010, the two traded bitcoins for a couple of pizzas and, in so doing, made history. That’s one small transaction for a couple of guys, one giant economic breakthrough for mankind!

Since there is a prevailing thought that the most valuable aspect of bitcoin is the blockchain technology behind it, investing in blockchain is another way of tangentially investing in bitcoin without the worrisome volatility. There are many large companies that have been developing their own blockchain networks for a variety of purposes that may be worth looking into.

Although Bitcoin is homogenous (the same everywhere in the world), its price varies across countries and even exchanges within the same country, giving a rise to arbitrage opportunities. At one point in 2017, the Bitcoin price in South Korea was trading at a 35% premium and in India, a 20% to 25% premium. The demand and supply conditions result in some aberrations in its price.
Remember that "Bitcoin exchange" and "Bitcoin wallet" need not be the same. Bitcoin exchanges are kind of like forex exchanges – places where you can trade Bitcoin for a fiat currency, say, BTC for USD and vice versa (in U.S. for example). While exchanges offer wallet capabilities to users, it’s not their primary business. Since wallets need to be kept safe and secure, exchanges do not encourage storing of Bitcoins for higher amounts or long periods of time. Hence, it is best to transfer your Bitcoins to a secure wallet. Security must be your top priority while opting for a Bitcoin wallet; always opt for the one with multi-signature facility.
We are committed to researching, testing, and recommending the best products. We may receive commissions from purchases made after visiting links within our content. Learn more about our review process. Bitcoin took the world by storm as it rocketed from obscurity to nearly $20,000 in value per coin in 2017. The cryptocurrency markets have calmed down a bit since that record high, but many Bitcoin evangelists still claim Bitcoin to be the currency of the future. Follow along to learn more about how Bitcoin works and the best places to buy Bitcoin.
Bitcoin functions as the "reserve" currency of cryptocurrency. So it is very hard to buy other coins without first buying bitcoins. Once you purchase the bitcoins you can convert the bitcoins into other cryptocoins. This is mostly because Bitcoin has very good liquidity and is traded on every cryptocurrency exchange. So most coins are traded against Bitcoin rather than the US dollar or other fiat currencies.
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