The likelihood that Ayre’s planned appeals to Bitcoin exchanges — to only list his version of Bitcoin Cash — are successful feels, well, very small. Purely to stimulate trading of the SV coin (or any trading at all) on their exchange(s) and encourage deposits, some exchanges might well list SV exclusively. It would alienate some users, but the 80/20 rule applies: 20 percent of customers make up 80 percent of many business models. In this case, some small exchanges might want that 20 percent to become SV diehards or just people looking to dump their SV coins, or some combination of both. But anything approaching a volume or economic majority? Forget about it.
Even as the existing payments system in developed countries becomes ever more convenient and secure, the space is still littered with middle parties taking a small amount from each transaction. These players include payment processors, payment networks, issuing banks, and acquiring banks. The dream of bitcoin and other monetary systems based on blockchain technology is for payers to be free of these inherent costs of exchanging currency for goods.

Craig Steven Wright has explicitly stated that, in an attempt to ensure only “his” chain survives, he and others will use any hash power under their control to 51%-attack the Bitcoin ABC chain. Such attacks, first speculated about during Bitcoin’s scaling dispute in 2017, could, for example, consist of mining only empty blocks on Bitcoin ABC and “orphaning” (rejecting) any blocks mined by “honest” Bitcoin ABC miners. This would have the effect that no transactions will confirm on the Bitcoin ABC chain at all, and that “honest” miners will be strongly discouraged from mining on it: their hash power would go to waste. If Wright and others successfully take this (rather unprecedented) step, there would not be a meaningful chain-split after all: only the Bitcoin SV chain would survive.

Rising fees on the bitcoin network contributed to a push by some in the community to create a hard fork to increase the blocksize.[14] This push came to a head in July 2017 when some members of the Bitcoin community including Roger Ver felt that adopting BIP 91 without increasing the block-size limit favored people who wanted to treat Bitcoin as a digital investment rather than as a transactional currency.[15][16] This push by some to increase the block size met a resistance. Since its inception up to July 2017, bitcoin users had maintained a common set of rules for the cryptocurrency.[15] Eventually, a group of bitcoin activists,[12] investors, entrepreneurs, developers[15] and largely China based miners were unhappy with bitcoin's proposed SegWit improvement plans meant to increase capacity and pushed forward alternative plans for a split which created Bitcoin Cash.[11] The proposed split included a plan to increase the number of transactions its ledger can process by increasing the block size limit to eight megabytes.[15][16]
For me, though, I look at Bitcoin not just as a currency, but what it could do in the future in other applications. Think of the Bitcoin technology as a way to exchange and verify ownership. It’s like getting into your car with your smartphone. You present cryptographic proof of ownership. You’re the owner, and it’s verified through this common ledger. The car is able to identify that it is your car, and so the car starts. You’re done.
The specific technical details of the schism aren't very interesting—Bitcoin ABC wanted to tweak the bitcoin protocol, and Wright's faction favors maintaining something closer to the original design. But the schism has devolved into a power struggle over who will control Bitcoin Cash in the future. Wright's critics worry that having him closely associated with Bitcoin Cash could damage the reputation of Bitcoin Cash.
An institute will be set up within Phore to develop long-term e-commerce solutions, investments and partnerships. Its aim is to strengthen and sustain Phore, allowing it to quickly react and pivot to challenges in the future. Phore Labs, part of the Phore Foundation, will work as an incubator / seed investor, primarly identifying potentially cutting-edge digital services and products. These will be sourced from individuals, universities, start-ups and cooperatives around the world.

Coinbase, for example, has been such a popular bitcoin investment app that its CEO posted to the company’s blog last week a warning that the sudden influx “does create extreme volatility and stress on our systems,” which can create a lag for users. The Chicago Board Options Exchange, on which the first bitcoin futures trading took place this week, warned that a flood of traffic ahead of the launch was slowing its site.
A scenario that feels likely to this reporter is that both chains live on indefinitely. Whether or not either token enjoys a bullish token price across exchanges, it’s hard to imagine Craig Wright or Calvin Ayre coming back into the fold at this point, nor Roger Ver and Jihan Wu welcoming them back if they decided to do so. CoinGeek by itself has the capability to prop up the SV blockchain, and its media efforts have the capability to continually attract new users and widen the base. (Bitcoin ABC has the same capabilities utilizing a wider array of resources – Jihan Wu, Roger Ver, the coterie of major exchanges which have come out in definitive support of ABC.)
Bitcoin Cash (BCC)/BCH is a hard forked version of the original Bitcoin. It is similar to bitcoin with regards to its protocol; Proof of Work SHA-256 hashing, 21,000,000 supply, same block times and reward system. However, two main differences are the block size limits, as of August 2017 Bitcoin has a 1MB block size limit whereas (BCC)/BCH proposes 8MB blocks. Also, (BCC)/BCH will adjust the difficulty every 6 blocks as opposed to 2016 blocks as with Bitcoin.
You can buy bitcoins from a bitcoin exchange or online broker, directly from another individual, or from an ATM. Coin ATM Radar lists about 50 bitcoin ATMs in London, many of them in convenience stores. As when buying foreign currencies, there’s a fee, which can range from 3.1% to 17.6%. The website covers 56 countries and you can search for an ATM near you.
Bitcoin OTC markets are “off-the-books” decentralized exchanges that occur through face-to-face meetings and remote trades. In a face-to-face exchange, the buyer and seller will meet at a designated time and place and exchange cash for bitcoin at an agreed-upon rate. In remote exchanges, the trade is coordinated by telephone, email, or another remote communication method. After a price is agreed upon between buyer and seller, the buyer will send an electronic funds transfer to the seller and the seller will send the bitcoin to the buyer’s bitcoin address.
Abra is a bitcoin-based digital wallet app that lives on your smartphone. It is the easiest way to buy, sell, store, send and receive bitcoin from anywhere in the world. It’s similar to a brokerage, but it’s also a wallet. Abra supports bitcoin as well as over 50 global currencies which means you can convert in and out of bitcoin or any available currency, easily. You can also send bitcoin to anyone who has a bitcoin or an Abra wallet and receive bitcoin or money.
In order to buy bitcoins, local currency, like the U.S. dollar or Euro, must be exchanged for bitcoins. In this process trust users must trust the Bitcoin exchange to secure money and not run away with funds. It’s best to use a regulated Bitcoin exchange. Most exchanges offer information about their regulatory compliance on their websites. If an exchange seems shady and doesn’t offer information about regulation or who’s behind the site, it’s best to find a different exchange.
To achieve Phore’s ambitious vision for 2018 we will be adding experienced developers dedicated to development of the Phore core blockchain technology, products and services, both as part of the Phore core team as well as increased developer participating within the Phore community. We are already in discussion with several talented developers about joining the Phore team and this will continue into Q1 2018.
Although Bitcoin is homogenous (the same everywhere in the world), its price varies across countries and even exchanges within the same country, giving a rise to arbitrage opportunities. At one point in 2017, the Bitcoin price in South Korea was trading at a 35% premium and in India, a 20% to 25% premium. The demand and supply conditions result in some aberrations in its price.

Since very few countries in the world are working on regulation of Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency in general, these exchanges can be shut down. This happened in China sometime in September 2017. Exchanges are also at risk of getting hacked and you might lose your Bitcoin if you store it on an exchange. You can read about the biggest Bitcoin hacks here.
Bitcoin futures have fairly extreme pros and cons to them. Contracts are leveraged in that you're paying a fraction of bitcoin's actual price when you buy futures, giving you a chance to profit off them. However, the contract has an expiration date in the near future. If the price is down when it expires, you can't simply hold and wait to see if it bounces back; you just lose.
Even as the existing payments system in developed countries becomes ever more convenient and secure, the space is still littered with middle parties taking a small amount from each transaction. These players include payment processors, payment networks, issuing banks, and acquiring banks. The dream of bitcoin and other monetary systems based on blockchain technology is for payers to be free of these inherent costs of exchanging currency for goods.

It will also depend on miners’ and users’ vision for the currency. If bitcoin really does undermine the decentralized nature of the network, and the democratic possibilities of the blockchain technology, people may look elsewhere for a cryptocurrency with more exciting potential. (For more insights on how the market has changed since the fork, read: What's Bitcoin Cash and Where the Heck Did it Come From?)
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