By now you can probably see that the answer isn’t that simple. It’s not just a matter of should you invest, but also a matter of how to invest. Like I said in the beginning, start by educating yourself. Learn about the currency, what affects it, what are its advantages and disadvantages, etc. You can get a lot of basic education through our free Bitcoin crash course (sign up at the bottom of this post).
When thinking about how to invest in Bitcoin, you must always consider the cons of investing. The price of Bitcoin changes all the time. However, these aren’t just small changes. For example, after Bitcoin hit its highest price of $19,839 on the 17th December 2017, it dropped to $12,015 on the 22nd December. That’s a total loss of $7,824 in just 5 days!

The main objective of Bitcoin Cash is to to bring back the essential qualities of money inherent in the original Bitcoin software. Over the years, these qualities were filtered out of Bitcoin Core and progress was stifled by various people, organizations, and companies involved in Bitcoin protocol development. The result is that Bitcoin Core is currently unusable as money due to increasingly high fees per transactions and transfer times taking hours to complete. This is all because of the 1MB limitation of Bitcoin Core’s block size, causing it unable to accommodate to large number of transactions.
The appeal for many is the fact that Bitcoin is decentralized, meaning no specific group or governing body has control over it. Instead, it is secured by advanced cryptography, a set of military-grade encryptions, and regulated by a network called the Blockchain. The Blockchain acts as a digital ledger, confirming buyer/seller funds and establishing the order in which transactions take place.
For me, though, I look at Bitcoin not just as a currency, but what it could do in the future in other applications. Think of the Bitcoin technology as a way to exchange and verify ownership. It’s like getting into your car with your smartphone. You present cryptographic proof of ownership. You’re the owner, and it’s verified through this common ledger. The car is able to identify that it is your car, and so the car starts. You’re done.

I was especially impressed by the methodology approach of the content. The book is very well organized. Compare and contrast. Definition and examples. Legitimacy and fraud. And, to the authors credit, I liked that they presented unbiased references of business industry giants and business moguls who supported Bitcoin [pg.27], contrasted with those who did not [pg.31].
SEARCHING FOR information on YouTube about bitcoin will immediately lead to a flood of promotional videos, some with Bill Gates' face on the logo and a "Bill Gates talks about bitcoin" tagline. Not surprisingly, when you click on it you won't find Bill Gates or Warren Buffett, but the same message of "hop on the bitcoin wagon before it's too late."
On Aug. 1, some miners and developers initiated what is known as a hard fork, effectively creating a new currency: Bitcoin cash. Bitcoin cash has implemented an increased block size of 8mb, to accelerate the verification process, with an adjustable level of difficulty to ensure the chain’s survival and transaction verification speed, regardless of the number of miners supporting it. This has raised concerns about the security of Bitcoin Cash.
Litecoin was developed in 2011. While it has faltered of late in value with the other cryptocurrencies, if it gains back that value, it will be because of its strengths in comparison to bitcoin: Significantly faster transaction time (one major complaint when bitcoin exploded was that the increase in users slowed down transactions tremendously) and a larger number of crypto tokens.

The bitcoin-ml mailing list is a good venue for making proposals for changes that require coordination across development teams. Workgroups have been set up to assist developers to coordinate and seek peer-review. For those wishing to implement changes to the Bitcoin Cash protocol, it is recommended to seek early peer-review and engage collaboratively with other developers through the workgroups.


In simplified language, McDonald outlines step by step, every aspect of investing specific to digital money. With co-author Kastenhuber, every question [one would have] is anticipated, and every question is answered. Fortunately, McDonald goes further. He understands human nature, specific to the hesitancy of trying out new - possible risky financial products. Straightaway, the reader is not left to ponder. Bitcoin is defined in clear precise language [pg.21].
How risky is investing in bitcoin compared to other financial assets? If the belief in bitcoin evaporates, it will free-fall and should be avoided as an investment tool. Go into bitcoin if you can bear the downside, but do not buy looking to strike gold. If you are fine with losing all your capital and you are curious about bitcoin, and you believe that the demand for bitcoin is still going strong, then do it.
Down the road, Wright promises to make more changes to bring Bitcoin SV closer to the 0.1.0 version of the Bitcoin protocol. The block size limit will eventually be increased a lot more or even removed entirely. DSV will be dismantled. (Wright goes so far as to claim DSV would make Bitcoin ABC and its miners illegal. On Bitcoin SV, coins held in “DSV addresses” will likely be turned into donations to miners.) P2SH transactions (which allows for much transaction flexibility and was introduced in 2012) will be depreciated. More old OP codes will be restored. And the nChain chief scientist alluded to bringing “lost” coins back into circulation. (Where “lost” presumably refers to coins that haven’t moved in a long time.)
Bitcoin trading is different than buying and holding. When you are trading Bitcoins it means that you are actively trying to buy Bitcoins at a low price and sell them back at a higher price in relatively short time interval. Trading successfully requires knowledge and practice. The trading market is occupied by very large players who are just waiting for newbies to come in and throw their money away by trading aimlessly.
Just like you use an ATM for your local money (USD, EUR etc.), you can now use an ATM for Bitcoin! The only difference is, you cannot use Bitcoin ATMs to withdraw money. You can only use it to buy Bitcoin. The best thing about Bitcoin ATMs is that they are simple, easy to use and you can use cash/paper money. That’s one of the easiest answers on how to invest in Bitcoin.
To sell your Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies on an exchange after purchasing, just go to the appropriate page or tab, for example, Coinbase has a Buy/Sell tab where users can buy and sell on the same page. Most exchanges will charge a fee for selling, usually around 1%-2%. The exchange CEX.io will allow users to sell Bitcoin and receive funds directly to their credit card.
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